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Entries with tag crop protection .

Learn about high value crop monitoring for potatoes in a Hivacrom webinar, 23 Sept

The Hivacrom team will be holding a webinar on Friday 23rd September 2016 (12:30-13:00) to introduce the range of the services including, potato canopy development profiles, meteorological reports, integration of user-developed processes, yield forecasts, tools to aid assessment of fields for rent or purchase, sharing services between growers and packers / processors Workshop topics ...
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Smoking out blackgrass seeds

Blackgrass is a problem weed in UK agriculture, but a new technique may help farmers to combat its resistance to herbicides. Application of a smoke particle solution called 'smokewater' has been found to cause blackgrass seeds to germinate early, becoming vulnerable to certain herbicides which they would normally evade. Ten per cent of crops are lost due to weed growth - a statistic that...
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New coating method protects seeds from being eaten by insects

Chemists at ETH Zurich are developing a coating for seeds, inspired by nature's defences, which will deter or kill insect pests. Some seeds have their own defence systems against insect predators - for example the seeds of peaches contain amygdalin, which can degrade into hydrogen cyanide in the stomach. The scientists coat seeds in several layers of polylactic acid (PLA), with an...
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Field pathogenomics a defence against rust and other "cereal killers"

With the announcement that ‘Kranich’ yellow rust race has been detected in the UK for the first time, together with an increase in fungal infection among previously resistant varieties, a new approach to disease management and prediction, Field Pathogenomics, is to be welcomed. It is one of the promising new methods to be discussed at forthcoming Agri-Tech East Pollinator “Rusts and other...
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Field labs give insights into blackgrass control and compost teas

As the warm wet weather encourages winter-sown wheat to get away, concerns are being raised that blackgrass is also thriving. Liz Bowles, Head of Farming for the Soil Association, comments that field labs – which provide an opportunity to experiment with different cultivation techniques on a farm scale – are offering farmers new insights. She will be discussing results from two such trials...
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Study identifies 5 chemicals that trigger rice plants to fend off common pest

Chemical triggers that make plants defend themselves against insects could replace pesticides, causing less damage to the environment. New research published in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters identifies five chemicals that trigger rice plants to fend off a common pest – the white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera. Pesticides are used around the world to control...
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Agri-Tech East Pollinator event will look at new approaches to pesticides and natural products

The Good, the Bad and the (B)ugly, 19 January 2016, Norwich Slugs are on the increase and they are getting more determined. The first real sign of the scale of the problem was seen during the warm wet weather of 2012, which triggered an invasion of slugs not previously seen in the UK. The John Innes Centre (JIC) warns new thinking is needed if we are to protect valuable food...
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The Good, the Bad and the (B)ugly - Agri-Tech East Pollinator event on fungi and slugs, 7 Jul 2015, Norwich

Agri-Tech East Pollinator: The Good, the Bad and the (B)ugly 7 July 2015,  Centrum, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UG In this Agri-Tech East Pollinator event we’ll be exploring the split personalities of fungi. Some cause devastating crop diseases (such as the late blight of potatoes, responsible for the Irish Potato Famine), while others help boost plant growth and have...
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Researchers show that plants exposed to bacteria activate their immune system using three separate mechanisms

Spring is just around the corner and for many of us that means planting a garden with plenty of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes. However, some of the plants will be infected by bacteria, leading to stunted growth and less nutritional value. Now, a University of Missouri research team has uncovered new regulations of defense pathways for plants. This discovery could lead to helping...
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Fighting the Colorado potato beetle with RNA interference

Colorado potato beetles are a dreaded pest of potatoes all over the world. Since they do not have natural enemies in most potato producing regions, farmers try to control them with pesticides. However, this strategy is often ineffective because the pest has developed resistances against nearly all insecticides. Now, scientists from the Max Planck Institutes of Molecular Plant Physiology in...
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Research paves way for new generation of fungicides

BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Exeter have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which pathogenic fungi avoid the immune responses of the plants they attack. The research, led by Professor Giro Steinberg, opens up a whole new area of research into plant-host interaction which could lead to the development of fungicides that are able to act before the plant is harmed. ...
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New biological control against parasitic nematode that reduces potato crops

Approximately six thousand hectares of Veracruz, in the west coast of Mexico, are dedicated to the production of potatoes ( Solanum tuberosum ), but during the past 30 years the presence of the golden nematode of potatoes ( Globodera rostochiensis ) has reduced performance of the crop by more than 40 percent. According to records of the Institute of Ecology (INECOL) in Mexico, there were...
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New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a BBSRC-funded study led by the University of Exeter. More than one-in-ten pest types can already be found in around half the countries that grow their host crops. If this spread advances at its current rate, scientists fear...
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Scientists uncover how bacterial parasites turn plants into the living dead

Forget popular video game Plants Vs. Zombies, some plants are zombies and BBSRC-funded scientists have uncovered how bacterial parasites turn them into the living dead. "For the first time, we can reveal how this remarkable manipulation takes place," says Professor Saskia Hogenhout from the John Innes Centre.  "In that sense, the plant world is ahead of animal...
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Climate change puts wheat crops at risk of disease

There is a risk that severity of epidemics of some wheat diseases may increase within the next ten to twenty years due to the impacts of climate change according to a study by international researchers led by the University of Hertfordshire. The researchers carried out a survey in China to establish a link between weather and the severity of epidemics of fusarium ear blight on the wheat...
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Hidden crop pest threat to poorer nations revealed

The abundance of crop pests in developing countries may be greatly underestimated, posing a significant threat to some of the world's most important food producing nations, according to research led by the University of Exeter. Data on the known distributions of almost 2,000 crop-destroying organisms in 195 countries were analysed in the first global assessment of the factors determining...
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Rice seed treatments found to be effective in managing insect pest

When every extra expense makes a difference in profitability, farmers often wonder which management decisions are worth the extra cost. One recent example is the development of seeds treated with insecticides to discourage early damage by crop pests. Researchers at Mississippi State University have been evaluating the effectiveness of rice seed treatments to find out what producers can...
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New study confirms that GM crops do not harm beneficial insects and nematodes

A large body of literature has shown that genetically-modified plants that produce proteins from the bacterium  Bacillus thuringiensis  (Bt) to protect themselves from insect pests have little to no effect on a wide range of nontarget insects. However, concerns about Bt crops still exist. Now two new studies using more exacting methods show that Bt crops have no negative effects on...
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Colour of traps makes a difference to sweetpotato weevils

The sweetpotato weevil,  Cylas formicarius  (Fabricius), is the most serious pest of sweetpotato around the world, damaging sweetpotatoes in the field and in storage. Because the larval period is spent within vines or tubers, and the adults are nocturnal, chemical control frequently is not effective. Mass trapping using synthetic pheromones has suppressed populations of...
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List of European countries which are most likely to be next “victims” of invasion by insect pests

Climate change means that Europe’s insect pest invasion is going to get worse. Scientists in the Department of Biology at the University of Fribourg, in collaboration with the Swiss Research Station Agroscope ART and the University of Neuenburg, have discovered factors which have an effect on the probability of insect pests taking hold in Europe. In this study, which was published in the...
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Crop-infecting virus forces aphids to spread disease

BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Cambridge have shown that viruses use aphids as pawns, discouraging the insects from permanently settling on already-infected crops and using this forced migration to spread infection to healthy vegetation. Aphids are sap-sucking insects that attack many different types of plants and are major transmitters of crop-infecting viruses. By...
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New study maps how oilseed rape pathogen spreads in China

Evidence of disease in oilseed rape crops across China and how it may spread has been mapped by researchers led by the University of Hertfordshire - providing new strategic information on crop protection to the Chinese government. Oilseed rape is prone to phoma stem canker, also known as blackleg disease, caused by twoLeptosphaeria species.  The more damaging...
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Defending food crops from whitefly-transmitted plant viruses

Research recently published in JoVE, the Journal of Visualized Experiments, introduces a new technique to aid in the development of defenses against diseases threatening food crops worldwide. The method, published under the title Transmitting Plant Viruses Using Whiteflies, is applicable to such at-risk crops as tomatoes and common bean plants. The whitefly method provides a means of...
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Pathogen that caused Irish Potato Famine is even more virulent now

The plant pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s lives on today with a different genetic blueprint and an even larger arsenal of weaponry to harm and kill plants. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, North Carolina State University plant pathologist Jean Ristaino and colleagues Mike Martin and Tom Gilbert from the University of Copenhagen compared...
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UK’s Agricultural Resilience Strengthened by New Initiative in York

The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) and the University of York have announced a new joint venture: an Initiative in Agrifood Resilience. This announcement was made on the same day as the Government launched its new UK Agricultural Technologies Strategy , which sets out how investment will back the technologies of the future allowing our agricultural industries to grow and...
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