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The Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) has refreshed its online platform to intelligently connect you to relevant events, funding, thought pieces and specialist staff to help your business innovate and grow.

You can discover content using your area of interest, from Materials to transport; from space to health – all major UK economic sectors are covered. Once you have selected your interests, using our intelligent tagging system, we will then display rich and relevant content related to your area, often from surprising sources.

An example might be new satellite technology from the space sector that is applicable in the agri-food sector. KTN-UK.co.uk will help you form these unusual and valuable connections.

All content on the platform has been carefully curated by our team of innovation specialists – not by an automated algorithm – so you can be confident that KTN is connecting you to the most relevant cutting-edge information.

 

The move also marks a closer alignment with our main funder, Innovate UK , with the website branding making a clear visual link. Knowledge Transfer Network is Innovate UK's innovation network partner, and also works with other funders to provide innovation networking services and fulfil our mission to drive UK growth.

We link new ideas and opportunities with expertise, markets and finance through our network of businesses, universities, funders and investors. From agri-food to autonomous systems and from energy to design, KTN combines expertise in all sectors with the ability to cross boundaries. Connecting with KTN can lead to potential partners, horizon-expanding events and innovation insights relevant to your needs.

Visit our people pages to connect directly with expertise in your sector.

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Articles

Entries with tag sensors .

New nanocomposite material as CO2 sensor

A new material changes its conductivity depending on the concentration of CO 2  in the environment. The researchers who developed it have utilized the material to produce a miniature, simply constructed sensor. Material scientists at ETH Zurich and the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam have developed a new type of sensor that can measure carbon...
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3-D printing with custom molecules creates low-cost mechanical sensor

Imagine printing out molecules that can respond to their surroundings. A research project at the University of Washington merges custom chemistry and 3-D printing. Scientists created a bone-shaped plastic tab that turns purple under stretching, offering an easy way to record the force on an object. “At the UW, this is a marriage that’s been waiting to happen – 3-D printing from the...
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Peratech creates fast-acting Electronic Nose using QTC technology

Peratech, the innovator in touch technology, is developing an Electronic Nose using its award-winning, Quantum Tunnelling Composite material.  This new sensor technology detects the presence of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) very rapidly and can recover equally quickly, in a matter of seconds.   QTC™ materials change their resistance when a force is applied and,...
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Using cell phones to detect harmful airborne substances

The lab of a University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering professor was named on Tuesday, April 3 after Innovation Economy Corporation, a Riverside company that plans to commercialize his research focused on using mobile devices, such as cell phones, to detect harmful airborne substances in real-time.   The technology being developed...
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Researchers demonstrate versatility of solid-state protein sensor

A novel type of sensor, based on nanometer-scale pores in a semiconductor membrane, is a step closer to practical use in applications such as analyzing the protein contents of a single cell. Researchers pioneering single-molecule nanopore sensor technology at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) have shown its potential through a succession of experiments over the past few years. Now,...
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Researchers develop paper-thin device to test cholesterol levels

Paper-thin sensors that use the latest technology in miniaturisation and printing could revolutionise the way point of care testing is carried out for cholesterol and lead to further applications and developments of the technology.   The state-of the-art sensors will analyse and display results taken from a blood sample and will include a printed battery and mobile phone...
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Oxford Nanopore introduces DNA 'strand sequencing' on the high-throughput GridION platform and presents MinION, a sequencer the size of a USB stick

Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd. has presented for the first time DNA sequence data using its novel nanopore 'strand sequencing' technique and proprietary high performance electronic devices GridION and MinION.  These data were presented by Clive G Brown, Chief Technology Officer, who outlined the Company's pathway to a commercial product with highly disruptive features...
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Smart paint could revolutionise structural safety

An innovative low-cost smart paint that can detect microscopic faults in wind turbines, mines and bridges before structural damage occurs is being developed by researchers at the University. The environmentally-friendly paint uses nanotechnology to detect movement in large structures, and could shape the future of safety monitoring.   Traditional methods of assessing...
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Molecular scientists develop color-changing stress sensor

It is helpful — even life-saving — to have a warning sign before a structural system fails, but, when the system is only a few nanometers in size, having a sign that’s easy to read is a challenge.  Now, thanks to a clever bit of molecular design by University of Pennsylvania and Duke University bioengineers and chemists, such warning can come in the form of a simple...
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"Watermark Ink" device identifies unknown liquids instantly

Materials scientists and applied physicists have invented a new device that can instantly identify an unknown liquid. The device, which fits in the palm of a hand and requires no power source, exploits the chemical and optical properties of precisely nanostructured materials to distinguish liquids by their surface tension.   The findings from the researchers collaborating at...
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New Graphene discovery boosts oil exploration efforts, could enable self-powered microsensors

Researchers have developed a new method to harvest energy from flowing water. This discovery aims to hasten the creation of self-powered microsensors for more accurate and cost-efficient oil exploration.   Led by Rensselaer Professor Nikhil Koratkar, the researchers investigated how the flow of water over surfaces coated with the nanomaterial graphene could generate small...
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Miniaturised power modules for aircraft bodies

Sensor networks are supposed to pervade the body of airplanes in the future – much like a nervous system. Thanks to a joint research project of EADS Deutschland GmbH (Germany) and the Vienna University of Technology, the single sensor elements do not require any external power supply.   Aircraft maintenance can be time consuming and expensive. It is much simpler if the...
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Developing materials at the nanoscale

Scientists have secured £5 million of funding for research into nanotechnology that could result in faster computers, smarter sensors and more energy-efficient mobile phones.   Led by the University of Southampton and funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the research team aims to develop the technique of supercritical fluid...
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Solar-powered nano sensor targets gases more polluting than carbon

A solar-powered sensor station to monitor in real time the concentration of gases that are key culprits in climate change and air pollution has been installed on a QUT Gardens Point roof as part of an international study on solar-powered environmental nano sensors.   Alexander Malaver, a QUT School of Engineering systems master student, said the sensor was a prototype for a...
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Quantum sensor tracked in human cells could aid drug discovery

Groundbreaking research has shown a quantum atom has been tracked inside a living human cell and may lead to improvements in the testing and development of new drugs.   Professor Lloyd Hollenberg from the University of Melbourne’s School of Physics who led the research said it is the first time a single atom encased in nanodiamond has been used as a sensor to explore the...
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Carbon nanotube sensor developed by chemical engineers can detect tiny traces of explosives

Researchers have created a new detector so sensitive it can pick up a single molecule of an explosive such as TNT. To create the sensors, MIT chemical engineers led by Michael Strano coated carbon nanotubes — hollow, one-atom-thick cylinders made of pure carbon — with protein fragments normally found in bee venom. This is the first time those proteins have been shown to react to...
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New material could improve safety for first responders to chemical hazards

A new kind of sensor could warn emergency workers when carbon filters in the respirators they wear to avoid inhaling toxic fumes have become dangerously saturated.   In a recent issue of the journal Advanced Materials, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego and Tyco Electronics describe how they made the carbon nanostructures and demonstrate their...
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New “nanobead” approach could revolutionize sensor technology

Researchers have found a way to use magnetic “nanobeads” to help detect chemical and biological agents, with possible applications in everything from bioterrorism to medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring or even water and food safety.   When fully developed as a hand-held, portable sensor, like something you might see in a science fiction movie, it will...
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Director of Flinders University’s Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology on UK mission

Professor David Lewis, Director of Flinders University’s Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology, has been chosen to take part in Austrade’s Visiting Researcher Program to Europe in 2011.   One of only eight Australian researchers from the clean energy and biotechnology sector to receive this support, Professor Lewis will visit four UK universities in May to...
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Researchers develop battery-less chemical detector

Unlike many conventional chemical detectors that require an external power source, Lawrence Livermore researchers have developed a nanosensor that relies on semiconductor nanowires, rather than traditional batteries.   The device overcomes the power requirement of traditional sensors and is simple, highly sensitive and can detect various molecules quickly. Its development...
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3D printing method advances electrically small antenna design

While most electronic components benefit from decreased size, antennas—whether in a cell phone or on an aircraft—suffer limitations in gain, efficiency, system range, and bandwidth when their size is reduced below a quarter-wavelength.   Recent attention has been directed toward producing antennas by screen-printing, inkjet printing, and liquid metal-filled...
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University unveils plans for £89m technology and innovation centre

A world-leading research and technology centre that will transform the way universities, business and industry collaborate to bring global competitive advantage to Scotland, launched 11 March at the University of Strathclyde.   The Technology and Innovation Centre at Strathclyde (TIC) will bring together 850 academics, researchers and project managers from the University and...
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