KTN's online platform helps you to make the connections you need

 

The Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) has refreshed its online platform to intelligently connect you to relevant events, funding, thought pieces and specialist staff to help your business innovate and grow.

You can discover content using your area of interest, from Materials to transport; from space to health – all major UK economic sectors are covered. Once you have selected your interests, using our intelligent tagging system, we will then display rich and relevant content related to your area, often from surprising sources.

An example might be new satellite technology from the space sector that is applicable in the agri-food sector. KTN-UK.co.uk will help you form these unusual and valuable connections.

All content on the platform has been carefully curated by our team of innovation specialists – not by an automated algorithm – so you can be confident that KTN is connecting you to the most relevant cutting-edge information.

 

The move also marks a closer alignment with our main funder, Innovate UK , with the website branding making a clear visual link. Knowledge Transfer Network is Innovate UK's innovation network partner, and also works with other funders to provide innovation networking services and fulfil our mission to drive UK growth.

We link new ideas and opportunities with expertise, markets and finance through our network of businesses, universities, funders and investors. From agri-food to autonomous systems and from energy to design, KTN combines expertise in all sectors with the ability to cross boundaries. Connecting with KTN can lead to potential partners, horizon-expanding events and innovation insights relevant to your needs.

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Articles

Entries with tag graphene .

Creating Value from Non-Carbon 2D Materials – Beyond Graphene

KTN is organizing a stakeholder workshop to bring together leading academics working on 2D materials and devices from across UK to meet with potential industry users and the wider supply chain to explore the opportunities and challenges faced in bringing these other 2D materials to market. (Draft) Agenda - Non-Carbon 2D Materials State of Art Review project briefing and...
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Drum beats from a one atom thick graphite membrane

Researchers from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vibrations of a drum of nanometre scale thickness — realizing the world's smallest and most versatile drum.    This work has implications in improving the sensitivity of small detectors of mass — very important in detecting the mass of small molecules like...
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Innovative Exeter research pioneers nanotechnology for gas sensing

A team of scientists from the University of Exeter have created a new type of device that could be used to develop cost-effective gas sensors.   The pioneering team, which includes two second year Exeter undergraduates, have created a new type of device that emits light in the infrared part of the spectrum. Many important gases strongly absorb infrared light and this...
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Primary Dispersions Limited working to develop graphene based epoxy resins for the aerospace industry

CPI spin out company Primary Dispersions Limited has announced extremely promising results from a UK collaboration that aims to commercialise specialist graphene based epoxy resins for the aerospace industry. The InnovateUK project titled ‘NanoSynth’ which began in April 2013 has been able to show significant improvements in epoxy resin mechanical, thermal and electrical...
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Lloyd’s Register Foundation awards £9 million grants in nanotechnology

The Lloyd’s Register Foundation has awarded grants totalling £9 million to three international consortia in the field of nanotechnology. These grants support research and doctoral training that will support the Foundation’s aims to advance engineering-related education and research and support work that enhances safety of life at sea, on land and in the air. Professor Richard Clegg,...
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UK researchers plan to develop 3D-printed graphene batteries

LONGER-lasting batteries could be 3D printed from graphene ink to tackle rising demand for energy storage products in household devices or renewable energy systems. Professor Craig Banks is leading the new project to develop a desktop printer to create batteries, supercapacitors and energy storage devices for phones or tablets, and solar, wind and wave power storage. ...
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Graphene-based film can be used for efficient cooling of electronics

The film has a thermal conductivity capacity that is four times that of copper; moreover, the graphene film is attachable to electronic components made of silicon. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a method for efficiently cooling electronics using graphene-based film. The film has a thermal conductivity capacity that is four times that of copper....
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Launch of Women in Graphene Network

Graphene Week 2015 saw the launch of Women in Graphene, a support network for women in graphene and related 2d materials research. As in other areas of science and engineering, women make up significant proportion of the 2d materials workforce, but they face a number of gender-specific barriers to career progression. A fringe meeting on the Wednesday afternoon of Graphene Week was...
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Improving the delivery of chemotherapy with graphene

A new study published in IOP Publishing’s journal 2D Materials has proposed using graphene as an alternative coating for catheters to improve the delivery of chemotherapy drugs. The research suggests that placing graphene – an extremely thin sheet of carbon atoms – on the internal surfaces of intravenous catheters commonly used to deliver chemotherapy drugs into a patient’s...
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Thin coating on condensers could make power plants more efficient

Graphene layer one atom thick could quadruple rate of condensation heat transfer in generating plants. Most of the world’s electricity-producing power plants — whether powered by coal, natural gas, or nuclear fission — make electricity by generating steam that turns a turbine. That steam then is condensed back to water, and the cycle begins again. But the condensers that...
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UK scientists print low cost radio frequency antenna with graphene ink

The 'wonder material' takes an important step toward commercial applications like wearable wireless devices and sensors connected to the 'Internet of Things' Scientists have moved graphene -- the incredibly strong and conductive single-atom-thick sheet of carbon -- a significant step along the path from lab bench novelty to commercially viable material for new electronic applications....
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Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean

In 2013 James Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, and colleagues at Columbia demonstrated that they could dramatically improve the performance of graphene--highly conducting two-dimensional (2D) carbon--by encapsulating it in boron nitride (BN), an insulating material with a similar layered structure. In work published this week in the Advance...
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'Holey' graphene for energy storage

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability of capacitors for potential applications in cars, wind...
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3D-printed aerogels improve energy storage

A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature...
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European Commission publishes thematic issue on "Nanomaterials' functionality"

Nanomaterials – at a scale of one thousand times smaller than a millimetre – offer the promise of radical technological development. Many of these will improve our quality of life, and develop our economies, but all will be measured against the overarching principle that we do not make some error, and harm ourselves and our environment by exposure to new forms of hazard. This Thematic Issue...
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Imperfect Graphene Opens Door to Better Fuel Cells

The honeycomb structure of pristine graphene is beautiful, but Northwestern University scientists, together with collaborators from five other institutions, have discovered that if the graphene naturally has a few tiny holes in it, you have a proton-selective membrane that could lead to improved fuel cells. A major challenge in fuel cell technology is efficiently separating...
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Graphene Meets Heat Waves

EPFL researchers have shed new light on the fundamental mechanisms of heat dissipation in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. They have shown that heat can propagate as a wave over very long distances. This is key information for engineering the electronics of tomorrow. In the race to miniaturize electronic components, researchers are challenged with a major problem:...
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2-DTech & Dyesol Announce Cooperation to Develop Graphene Enhanced Photovoltaic Devices

Helping industry unlock graphene’s potential, 2-DTech has been awarded a grant worth £98,000 from InnovateUK to carry out research relating to graphene being integrated into solid state dye-sensitised solar cells. As a result, the company is linking up with solar technology specialist Dyesol in order to undertake this new, high profile project. Currently the vast majority of...
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Chancellor Osborne Visits National Graphene Institute

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne paid a visit to the National Graphene Institute (NGI), as further details emerged about the new £235m Sir Henry Royce Advanced Materials Institute based at The University of Manchester. The Chancellor was shown state-of-the-art cleanrooms and laboratories at the £61m NGI by Nobel Laureate Sir Kostya Novoselov and signed one of the...
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Graphene and Tungsten disulfide single-atom layers snapped together like Legos

  Physicists at the University of Kansas have fabricated an innovative substance from two different atomic sheets that interlock much like Lego toy bricks. The researchers said the new material — made of a layer of graphene and a layer of tungsten disulfide — could be used in solar cells and flexible electronics. Their findings have been published by Nature Communications . ...
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Graphene flaws key to creating hypersensitive ‘electronic nose’

Researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.  The study is available online in advance of print in Nature Communications.   In...
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Doped graphene nanoribbons with potential

Researchers from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have developed a new method to selectively dope graphene molecules with nitrogen atoms. By seamlessly stringing together doped and undoped graphene pieces, they were able to form 'heterojunctions' in the nanoribbons, thereby fulfilling a basic requirement for electronic current to flow in only one direction when voltage...
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19th century experiment and a bad bet may make industrial-scale production of graphene possible

A team of researchers from Pennsylvania State University (PSU) have developed a method of making graphene that could make it far easier to produce on an industrial scale.   "There are lots of layered materials similar to graphene with interesting properties, but until now we didn't know how to chemically pull the solids apart to make single sheets without damaging the layers,"...
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Graphene nanoloops increase current density 1000 times

Because graphene is two-dimensional, the placement of each atom has an increased impact compared to other materials. To fully grasp the relationship between atom placement and electrical conductivity, a team from the University of Pennsylvania used a highly advanced aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope (AC-TEM) to study ribbons of graphene - and discovered by chance that...
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Graphene — material of the future?

This article first appeared in the November 2012 issue of Aerospace International published by the Royal Aeronautical Society ( http://aerosociety.com/News/Publications/aeroint ).   Graphene has been much hyped as the revolutionary ‘miracle material’ of the future. Bill Read, Deputy Editor of Aerospace International looks at what all the excitement is about and...
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