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Articles

Entries with Technology Area Nanoscale Technologies .

Novel capping strategy improves stability of perovskite nanocrystals

Perovskite materials have shown great promise for use in next-generation solar cells, light-emitting devices (LEDs), sensors, and other applications, but their instability remains a critical limitation. Now r esearchers at the University of California (UC) Santa Cruz have attacked this problem by focusing on perovskite nanocrystals, in which the instability problems are magnified by the...
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Nanosubs are good to glow

The next generation of nanosubmarines being developed at Rice University in the US has been upgraded with tags that fluoresce longer, which enables the submersibles to be tracked for greater periods while being driven through a solution.   The single-molecule vehicles introduced by the Rice lab of chemist James Tour last year may someday be used to deliver drugs or other...
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Nanolaser for information technology

Silicon chip with integrated laser: Light from a nanowire   Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a nanolaser, a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Thanks to an ingenious process, the nanowire lasers grow right on a silicon chip, making it possible to produce high-performance photonic components cost-effectively. This will pave the way...
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New Type of Nanowires, Built with Natural Gas Heating

UNIST research team, developed a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique   A team of Korean researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently pioneered in developing a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique that uses self-catalytic growth process assisted by thermal decomposition of natural gas. According to the research team, this method is simple, reproducible,...
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A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs?

Traditional light bulbs, thought to be well on their way to oblivion, may receive a reprieve thanks to a technological breakthrough.   Incandescent lighting and its warm, familiar glow is well over a century old yet survives virtually unchanged in homes around the world. That is changing fast, however, as regulations aimed at improving energy efficiency are phasing out the old...
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Submit an article for Micro Matters special anniversary edition

Connecting Industry Micro Matters is soon to release a special Spring 2016 issue, marking the publication's one-year anniversary. KTN members are invited to submit relevant, original articles for consideration.   With an integral focus on micro tooling and equipment for ultra precision engineering, editorial in the Spring anniversary issue will include: Micro metal...
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Nano World Cancer Day 2016

Nanomedicine is applied nanotechnology to achieve innovation in healthcare. It virtually impacts all therapeutic areas, including oncology, cardiovascular diseases and neurologic disorders. With approximately 50 nanomedicine products already on the market and 200 more undergoing clinical trials, nanomedicine is already showing its benefits to patients.   The most active and...
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Drexel materials scientists aid Australian Institution in developing super-absorbent material

In hopes of limiting the disastrous environmental effects of massive oil spills, Materials scientists from Drexel University and Deakin University, in Australia, have teamed up to manufacture and test a new material, called a boron nitride nanosheet, that can absorb up to 33 times its weight in oils and organic solvents—a trait that could make it an important technology for quickly...
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Measuring Nanoscale Features with Fractions of Light

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers are seeing the light, but in an altogether different way.   And how they are doing it just might be the semiconductor industry's ticket for extending its use of optical microscopes to measure computer chip features that are approaching 10 nanometers, tiny fractions of the wavelength of light.   ...
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Nanobombs Might Deliver Agents That Alter Gene Activity in Cancer Stem Cells

Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) have developed nanoparticles that swell and burst when exposed to near-infrared laser light.   Such “nanobombs” might overcome a biological barrier that has blocked development of agents that work by altering the...
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New microscope creates near-real-time videos of nanoscale processes

Engineers at MIT have designed an atomic force microscope that scans images 2,000 times faster than existing commercial models. With this new high-speed instrument, the team produced images of chemical processes taking place at the nanoscale, at a rate that is close to real-time video.   In one demonstration of the instrument’s capabilities, the researchers scanned a 70-...
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An extreme close-up on heat transfer

New formula identifies limits to nanoscale heat transfer, may help optimize devices that convert heat to electricity.   How much heat can two bodies exchange without touching? For over a century, scientists have been able to answer this question for virtually any pair of objects in the macroscopic world, from the rate at which a campfire can warm you up, to how much heat the...
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Novel 'crumpling' of hybrid nanostructures increases SERS sensitivity

By "crumpling" to increase the surface area of graphene-gold nanostructures, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have improved the sensitivity of these materials, opening the door to novel opportunities in electronics and optical sensing applications.   "I believe that this work will benefit researchers in the area of surface plasmonics by providing...
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Graphene could take night-vision technology beyond ‘Predator’

Movies such as 1987’s “Predator,” in which an alien who sees in the infrared hunts down Arnold Schwarzenegger and his team, introduced a generation of sci-fi fans to thermal imaging.   Since then, heat-sensing devices have found many real-word applications but have remained relatively expensive and rigid. But a new development featuring graphene, reported in ACS’ journal Nano...
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Nanotweezer is new tool to create advanced plasmonic technologies

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A new type of "nanotweezer" capable of positioning tiny objects quickly and accurately and freezing them in place could enable improved nanoscale sensing methods and aid research to manufacture advanced technologies such as quantum computers and ultra-high-resolution displays.   The device, fabricated at Purdue University's Birck Nanotechnology Center ,...
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Development of nanostructuring technology to simultaneously control heat and electricity

The improvement of thermoelectric materials that can directly convert wasted heat to electric energy may lead to one of the solutions for energy issues.   For high performance in thermoelectric materials, it is required to easily conduct electricity while making it difficult for heat to pass through. Namely, high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity are...
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One direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene nanoribbons

In a development that could revolutionize electronic ciruitry, a research team from the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has confirmed a new way to control the growth paths of graphene nanoribbons on the surface of a germainum crystal.   Germanium is a semiconductor and this method provides a...
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New research could revolutionize flexible electronics, solar cells

BINGHAMTON, NY - Binghamton University researchers have demonstrated an eco-friendly process that enables unprecedented spatial control over the electrical properties of graphene oxide.   This two-dimensional nanomaterial has the potential to revolutionize flexible electronics, solar cells and biomedical instruments.   By using the probe of an atomic force...
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Researchers Build Nanoscale Autonomous Walking Machine from DNA

AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a nanoscale machine made of DNA that can randomly walk in any direction across bumpy surfaces.   Future applications of such a DNA walker might include a cancer detector that could roam the human body searching for cancerous cells and tagging them for medical imaging or drug targeting. ...
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HiPerNano 2015 — programme now available

HiPerNano 2015 is the 7th Conference and Exhibition that brings together nanotechnology solution developers and end-users with nanoengineering challenges to solve.   Nanotechnology is a key technology in innovative industries such as renewable energy, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics, and is the basis for many products and technologies that are in common use....
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Nanostructures for contactless control

Chemists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Univeristaet (LMU) have fabricated a novel nanosheet-based photonic crystal that changes colour in response to moisture. The new material could form the basis for humidity-sensitive contactless control of interactive screens on digital devices.   LMU chemists have developed a photonic crystal from ultrathin nanosheets which are extremely...
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Why platinum nanoparticles become less effective catalysts at small sizes

A*STAR scientists have used first-principles computer simulations to explain why small platinum nanoparticles are less effective catalysts than larger ones.   Platinum nanoparticles are used in the catalysis of many reactions, including the important hydrogen evolution reaction used in fuel cells and for separating water into oxygen and hydrogen. Improved effectiveness of...
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Phagraphene, a “Relative” of Graphene, Discovered

A group of scientists from Russia, the USA and China, led by Artyom Oganov from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), using computer generated simulation have predicted the existence of a new two-dimensional carbon material, a “patchwork” analogue of graphene called phagraphene. The results of their investigation were recently published in the journal Nano Letters....
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Reversible Writing with Light

Nanoparticles in a light-sensitive medium scatter in the light and aggregate in the dark. This method could be the basis of future "rewritable paper".   The medium is the message. Dr. Rafal Klajn of the Weizmann Institute’s Organic Chemistry Department and his group have given new meaning to this maxim: An innovative method they have now demonstrated for getting...
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Latest edition of Micro Matters available

Micro Matters is a publication focussing on precision engineering and micro process technologies for nanotechnology, MEMS and micro electronics. It is available free of charge to those who meet the publisher's criteria. The latest edition features an article by KTN's Tatiana Correia. View the latest edition of Micro Matters
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