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Entries with tag plants .

Survey on the future of Plant Phenotyping in the UK and Europe

The BBSRC funded UK Plant Phenotyping Network (UKPPN) is seeking to  engage with a broad cross-section of UK researchers via a survey to: Determine the current status of relevant UK plant phenotyping facilities and expertise available Assess which additional facilities and services are required by users in the UK. This will be used as a basis to create a fully...
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Summary of the last KTN's Plant Sector Board meeting on “Improving Nutritional Profile of Edible Plants: Challenges and Opportunities”

The meeting of the KTN Plant Sector Advisory Board was held on the 23 rd of October, and was kindly hosted by Campden BRI. The meeting was focused on investigating opportunities and challenges to innovation related to the theme of “Improving Nutritional Profile of Edible Plants: Challenges and Opportunities”, and was organised through a collaboration between the KTN Plant and Food sector...
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Are you an early career scientist carrying out research in areas of interest to the Agriculture Industry?

Early Career Researchers for Agriculture (Plant & Animal) Event Tuesday 22 March 2016, Birmingham Are you an early career scientist (MSc or PhD student or in 1st post-doc) carrying out research in areas of interest to the Agriculture Industry? If so you will want to come to this one-day KTN organised event to highlight your work to others in the broad area of UK...
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Catch up on the latest plants and crops news, funding and events

We have just published the July edition of our  Plant Sector Newsletter  - why not check it out and catch up with all the latest news, events and funding opportunities for the plant and crop sectors.  Highlights include a workshop we are hosting to promote the leatest round of funding from the Agri-Tech Catalyst, and the opportunities presented by ourcall for...
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Catch up on the latest plant and crops sector news, funding and events

We have just published the June edition of our  Plant Sector Newsletter  - why not check it out and catch up with all the latest news, events and funding opportunities for the plant and crop sectors.  Hot of the press is the news that KTN will open a CASE PhD Studentship call on 22nd June 2015. Not on our mailing list?  Please  click here ...
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New study finds tremendous diversity in regulation of nitrogen-fixing in plants

Researchers at Chapman University and Columbia University have published a study in Nature Plants this month, called “Diversity of nitrogen fixation strategies in Mediterranean legumes.” The recently published research focuses on a question that has intrigued scientists for decades—are plants able to regulate their relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria? Some groups of plants have...
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Supercomputer unlocks the secrets of plant cells to create more resilient crops

Scientists from the Universities of Melbourne and Queensland and IBM Research have moved a step closer to identifying the nanostructure of cellulose – the basic structural component of plant cell walls that provide fibre in our diet.  The insights could pave the way for more disease resistant varieties of crops and increase the sustainability of the pulp, paper and fibre industry – one...
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April edition of KTN's plant sector newsletter available now

The April 2015 edition of our Plant Sector Newsletter is now availble for those of you who are not on our email list. Click here to access all the latest news, events and funding opportunities for the plants and crops sector. Do you want to get the newsletter as soon as it is published? Why not email us at  agrifood@ktn-uk.org  and ask to be added to the Plant Sector...
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PlantSci2015

UK PlantSci 2015 is the forth annual conference of the UK Plant Science Federation. This year it was held at Harper Adams; a location synonymous with agriculture, not only by location, but, for those who have been there, also by smell. The meeting kicked off with an engaging overview by Guy Smith from the NFU, who holds the accolade of farming the driest farm in the UK. His talk not...
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Food-delivery process inside seeds revealed

New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer has identified biochemical pathways necessary for stocking a seed’s food supplies. These findings could be targeted when engineering crops for higher yields. Inside every seed is the embryo of a plant, and in most cases also a storage of food needed to power initial growth of the young seedling. A seed consists mainly of carbohydrates...
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Enhancing high-temperature tolerance in plants

A research group at the Kobe University Graduate School of Agricultural Science Functional Phytochemistry Laboratory has identified for the first time that the (E)-2-hexenal, a plant-derived chemical substance, can induce a plant’s stress response to high temperatures.  Key findings include: Plants essentially have a high-temperature resistance function. It is switched...
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Root growth regulation could help boost crop performance

Scientists have uncovered a new mechanism by which plants can regulate root architecture, a discovery that could lead to better ways of growing crops. Adaptable roots are critical for plants to survive in changing environmental conditions, to anchor the plant to the ground and take up water and nutrients. One important aspect of root architecture is root branching, or lateral root...
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Plants sense water in soil to grow roots in the right direction

Scientists have discovered how the presence of even small amounts of water can influence the structure of plant roots in soil, a finding that opens up new possibilities to improve water and nutrient foraging for important food crops. Significant improvements in crop yields are urgently required to meet the 50% increase in world population by 2050. The degree of root branching determines...
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PhD opportunities at the University of Copenhagen: Terpenoid production in hairy root lines and shoot cultures

THe Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science at University of Copenhagen is offering two PhD Scholarships in Terpenoid production in hairy root lines and shoot cultures, commencing 1 August 2014 or as soon as possible thereafter. This is an opening for two fully funded PhD Scholarships (Early Stage Researcher) under an EU FP7 Marie Curie Initial Training Network...
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Decoding the chemical vocabulary of plants

Plants spend their entire lifetime rooted to one spot. When faced with a bad situation, such as a swarm of hungry herbivores or a viral outbreak, they cannot flee so instead must fight to survive. What is the key to their defense? Chemistry. Thanks to this ongoing conflict, plants have evolved into amazing chemists, capable of synthesizing tens of thousands of compounds from thousands of...
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Research reveals how plants evolve ways to control embryo growth

A new generation of high yield plants could be created following a fundamental change in our understanding of how plants develop. The research, led by the University of Warwick and published in the journal Science, provides the first evidence that plants have evolved ways to control embryo growth and development by emitting information from surrounding cells. The international...
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Why seedlings always grow towards the light

Scientists from the Carnegie Institution at Stanford University and Wageningen University, part of Wageningen UR, have discovered how cells in the stems of seedlings use blue light to grow towards the light. During earlier research it was discovered that the cells in the seedling stems responded to blue light used in the microscope. The scientists have now discovered how the blue light...
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The emergence of new crop pests: genetics in action

BBSRC-funded scientists at Rothamsted Research discover the genetic mechanisms that allow aphids to adapt to a new host plant and provide natural resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides. Insect host shifts are important because they may be a first step in the evolution of new species and can create new pests of agriculturally important crops. A barrier to many potential insect host...
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Plant cell architecture: New understanding of how plants grow towards a light source

Inside every plant cell, a cytoskeleton provides an interior scaffolding to direct construction of the cell's walls, and thus the growth of the organism as a whole. Environmental and hormonal signals that modulate cell growth cause reorganization of this scaffolding. New research led by Carnegie's David Ehrhardt provides surprising evidence as to how this reorganization process works, with...
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The secret maths of plants: UCLA biologists uncover rules that govern leaf design

Life scientists from UCLA's College of Letters and Science have discovered fundamental rules of leaf design that underlie plants' ability to produce leaves that vary enormously in size. In their mathematical design, leaves are the "perfect machines," said Lawren Sack, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and senior author of the research. The UCLA team discovered the...
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Researchers show how plants tell the time

Plants use sugars to tell the time of day, according to research published in Nature this month. Plants, like animals, have a 24 hour 'body-clock' known as the circadian rhythm. This biological timer gives plants an innate ability to measure time, even when there is no light – they don't simply respond to sunrise, for example, they know it is coming and adjust their...
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Applications now open for New Phytologist Tansley Medal for outstanding contribution to plant science research

The New Phytologist Trust have announced that applications are now open for the Tansley Medal, which is awarded annually in recognition of an outstanding contribution to research in plant science by an individual in the early stages of their career. Who is eligible? Student and post-doctoral researchers with up to five years’ experience since gaining/defending their...
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Small but speedy: Short plants live in the evolutionary fast lane

Biologists have known for a long time that some creatures evolve more quickly than others. Exactly why isn't well understood, particularly for plants. But it may be that height plays a role, says Robert Lanfear of Australian National University and the U. S. National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. In a study to be published 21 May in the journal   Nature Communications ,...
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Do potatoes grow on vines? A review of the wild relatives of some favorite food plants

A new extensive study offers a complete revision and a new species from the vining Solanum species (the Dulcamaroid clade). The Solanaceae, also called the potato or nightshade family, includes a wide range of flowering plants, some of which are important agricultural crops. Tomatoes, potatoes, aubergines, peppers and wolfberries are all representatives of the family present on many...
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New grass hybrid could help reduce the likelihood of flooding

A collaboration of plant and soil scientists from across the UK has shown a grass hybrid species could help reduce the impact of flooding. The BBSRC-funded scientists, from Rothamsted Research, the James Hutton Institute, Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) at Aberystwyth University, Lancaster University and the University of Nottingham, used a hybridised...
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