Articles

Entries with tag plant genetics .

£4M awarded for new UK-Brazil joint projects in wheat research

A £4M investment between BBSRC and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) has been made to support collaborations between UK and Brazilian scientists in wheat research. The funding (£2M from the Newton Fund delivered through BBSRC, with matched resources from Embrapa) has been awarded to four partnerships between the UK and Brazil. The funding aims to inform the...
Read More About £4M awarded for new UK-Brazil joint projects in wheat research »

Salad days – tomatoes that last longer and still taste good

The tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) is one of the most valuable fruit crops in the world with an annual global value in excess of $50Bn. We eat so many they also play an important role in our diet providing valuable vitamins, minerals and health promoting phytochemicals. Plant breeders are working continuously to supply high yielding, better tasting, more nutritious and longer lasting tomato...
Read More About Salad days – tomatoes that last longer and still taste good »

PhD Studentship in Crop Genetics at the University of Reading

University of Reading School of Agriculture, Policy and Development  is advertising a PhD Studentship in Crop Genetics: Breeding for disease resistance and yield in faba bean. The deadline for applications is 6th June 2016. The PhD Fellowship is a joint research project between Teagasc, Oakpark and the School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of...
Read More About PhD Studentship in Crop Genetics at the University of Reading »

New gene-detecting technology brings new, resilient superwheat closer

Scientists at the John Innes Centre (JIC) and The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) have pioneered a new gene-detecting technology which, if deployed correctly could lead to the creation of a new elite variety of wheat with durable resistance to disease. Working with fellow scientists at TSL, Dr Brande Wulff from the JIC developed the new technology called 'MutRenSeq' which accurately pinpoints...
Read More About New gene-detecting technology brings new, resilient superwheat closer »

New technique accelerates isolation of potato late blight resistance genes

A team of scientists from The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) and The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) have developed a new method to accelerate isolation of plant disease resistance genes. The team have also identified a brand new source of blight resistance genes in  Solanum americanum , a wild relative of the potato. Plant pathogens such as late blight can evolve rapidly to overcome...
Read More About New technique accelerates isolation of potato late blight resistance genes »

Over 70% of essential crop wild relative species in urgent need of collection

Many of the wild plants which will be the building blocks for future global food supply are missing from the world's genebanks, according to new research by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in coordination with the Global Crop Diversity Trust (Crop Trust) and the Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG), Kew. These so-called crop wild relatives (CWR) -- distant cousins of...
Read More About Over 70% of essential crop wild relative species in urgent need of collection »

Uncorking the genetic ‘GINie’ for British crops and the value of academia-industry collaboration

Defra’s Genetic Improvement Networks Conference “Uncorking the genetic ‘GINie’ for British crops” The first ever joint meeting of all the DEFRA funded Genetic Improvement Networks (GIN) was a success. It was held on 22nd February 2016 and hosted at the John Innes Centre in Norwich. The event brought together over a hundred people from the UK plant breeding community, including plant...
Read More About Uncorking the genetic ‘GINie’ for British crops and the value of academia-industry collaboration »

Immunity gene fusions uncovered in plants

Researchers at The Genome Analysis Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory have surveyed immune genes across flowering plants to uncover the molecular ‘traps’ that plants use to detect pathogens. The findings could be used to help crops resist diseases. Plant health and interaction with microbes is maintained by intricate antennas called plant immune receptors. A certain class of...
Read More About Immunity gene fusions uncovered in plants »

Breeding wildness back into our fruit and veg

Wild tomatoes are better able to protect themselves against the destructive whitefly than our modern, commercial varieties, new research has shown. The study, published in the academic journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, shows that in our quest for larger, redder, longer-lasting tomatoes we have inadvertently bred out key characteristics that help the plant defend itself...
Read More About Breeding wildness back into our fruit and veg »

Scientists create first map of the wheat epigenome

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have carried out the first ever genome-wide survey of heritable molecular changes that regulate gene activity in wheat, in what could become a new tool to improve crop breeding technologies. Epigenetic marks are chemical tags which physically attach themselves to DNA, and modify its function without changing the genetic code. DNA methylation is...
Read More About Scientists create first map of the wheat epigenome »

Red clover genome to help restore sustainable farming

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) in collaboration with the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), has sequenced and assembled the DNA of red clover to help breeders improve the beneficial traits of this important forage crop. The paper is published in Scientific Reports, a journal from the Nature publishing group. Before industrial nitrogen...
Read More About Red clover genome to help restore sustainable farming »

John Innes Centre scientists use CRISPR technology to edit crop genes

CRISPR gene-editing is allowing rapid scientific advances in many fields, including human health and now it has been shown that crop research can also benefit from this latest exciting technology. A team of scientists from the John Innes Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory (UK), have shown that the very latest gene-editing technology CRISPR, can be used to make targeted changes or edits...
Read More About John Innes Centre scientists use CRISPR technology to edit crop genes »

Increasing production of seed oils by inducing genes involved in oil synthesis to work for longer

Plant-derived oils are widely used all over the world both for food and for industrial purposes. In recent years they have also attracted attention as raw materials for potential bio-fuels and bio-plastics that are friendly to the environment. Because of these, the demand for vegetable oils is expanding year by year. Researchers in Japan have succeeded in inducing the genes involved in oil...
Read More About Increasing production of seed oils by inducing genes involved in oil synthesis to work for longer »

Draft genome sequence of the "resurrection grass" published

A  new paper  published in Nature has reported the virtually complete draft genome of  Oropetium thomaeum , a grass species that can regrow after exposed to extreme drought when water becomes available. The plant’s 245 Mb genome was analyzed with 72x coverage on the PacBio® RS II Sequencing System.  The resulting assembly has an accuracy of 99.99995% and includes...
Read More About Draft genome sequence of the "resurrection grass" published »

TGAC announces an important milestone in wheat research

A more complete and accurate wheat genome assembly is being made available to researchers, by The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC). This landmark resource builds on international efforts in this area and will help wheat breeders accelerate their crop improvement programmes and researchers to discover genes for key traits such as yield, nutrient use and bread-making quality. As wheat is one...
Read More About TGAC announces an important milestone in wheat research »

Plant discovery could help develop stress-resistant crops

A gene that helps plants to remain healthy during times of stress has been identified by BBSRC-funded researchers at University of Oxford. Its presence helps plants to tolerate environmental pressures like drought – and it could help create crops that can better withstand adverse conditions. Plants rely on structures called chloroplasts within their cells to carry out photosynthesis –...
Read More About Plant discovery could help develop stress-resistant crops »

Sequencing of barley genome achieves new milestone

Barley, a widely grown cereal grain commonly used to make beer and other alcoholic beverages, possesses a large and highly repetitive genome that is difficult to fully sequence. Now a team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside has reached a new milestone in its work, begun in 2000, on sequencing the barley genome. The researchers have sequenced large portions of the...
Read More About Sequencing of barley genome achieves new milestone »

TGAC leads scheme to reduce threat to Vietnam's rice crop

As part of the  Newton Fund ,  The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC)  has been awarded over £50,000 by The British Council to develop advanced bioinformatics capabilities for next-generation rice genomics in Vietnam to aid precision breeding for improvement of this staple crop by exploring 48 local rice varieties. As the second-largest global exporter, rice is the most...
Read More About TGAC leads scheme to reduce threat to Vietnam's rice crop »

Unlocking the rice immune system

A bacterial signal that when recognized by rice plants enables the plants to resist a devastating blight disease has been identified by a multi-national team of researchers led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and the University of California (UC) Davis. The research team discovered that a tyrosine-sulfated bacterial protein called...
Read More About Unlocking the rice immune system »

Emmer wheat genome sequenced

A joint team from NRGene and Tel Aviv University has mapped the complete Emmer wheat genome in one month, significantly accelerating global research into crop improvement. NRGene’s DeNovoMAGIC TM  assembler has created long genome sequences (N90>1 million bp) covering 90% of the genome and anchored to an ultra-dense genetic map of Emmer wheat, producing a genome map equivalent...
Read More About Emmer wheat genome sequenced »

Melon genome study reveals recent impacts of breeding

The first comprehensive genome analyses of 7 melon varieties was completed by a research team led by Josep Casacuberta, Jordi Garcia-Mas and Sebastian Ramos-Onsins, providing breeders new knowledge important for understanding phenotypic variability and helping increasing plant quality yields by selective breeding. The findings were published in the advanced online edition of Molecular...
Read More About Melon genome study reveals recent impacts of breeding »

Extra DNA creates cucumber with all female flowers

Ask a plant researcher how the sex of a cucumber plant is determined and the person will tell you, “It’s complicated.” Depending on a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors, cucumbers can be seven different sexes. Some high-yield cucumber varieties produce only female flowers, and a new study identifies the gene duplication that causes this unusual trait. The study, led by...
Read More About Extra DNA creates cucumber with all female flowers »

Genetic discovery uncovers key tool for morphine production in poppies

Scientists at the University of York and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Australia have made a key genetic discovery in poppies, paving the way for more effective painkillers. The discovery, published in the latest issue of Science, reveals the long sought after gene that is seen as a critical gateway step in the synthesis of the morphinan class of alkaloids, which include the painkiller drugs...
Read More About Genetic discovery uncovers key tool for morphine production in poppies »

Plant breeder boosts soybean diversity, develops soybean rust-resistant plant

It took decades of painstaking work, but research geneticist Ram Singh managed to cross a popular soybean variety ("Dwight"  Glycine max ) with a related wild perennial plant that grows like a weed in Australia, producing the first fertile soybean plants that are resistant to soybean rust, soybean cyst nematode and other pathogens of soy. Singh works in the Soybean/Maize Germplasm,...
Read More About Plant breeder boosts soybean diversity, develops soybean rust-resistant plant »

New study shows that sweet potato is naturally transgenic

A new study of sweet potato genetics has demonstrated the “natural” transfer of DNA, mirroring the processes used by scientists to produce transgenic crops. In the study, which is published in PNAS , all of the 291 accessions of cultivated sweet potato tested contained one or more transfer DNA (T-DNA) sequences, implying that an  Agrobacterium  infection occurred further back...
Read More About New study shows that sweet potato is naturally transgenic »
Showing 1 - 25 of 84 results.
Items per Page 25
of 4

Subscribe to our updates

Subscribe to our newsletters
Follow us on twitter

Join us on LinkedIn

Keep up to date with the latest agri-food and biosciences news, events, funding opportunities and more.

Got a Question?

 

Email us Email Us
Contact a member of our team