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Entries with tag plant breeding .

Plant breeder boosts soybean diversity, develops soybean rust-resistant plant

It took decades of painstaking work, but research geneticist Ram Singh managed to cross a popular soybean variety ("Dwight"  Glycine max ) with a related wild perennial plant that grows like a weed in Australia, producing the first fertile soybean plants that are resistant to soybean rust, soybean cyst nematode and other pathogens of soy. Singh works in the Soybean/Maize Germplasm,...
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Researchers develop detailed genetic map of world wheat varieties

Kansas State University scientists have released findings of a complex, two-year study of the genomic diversity of wheat that creates an important foundation for future improvements in wheat around the world. Their work has produced the first haplotype map of wheat that provides detailed description of genetic differences in a worldwide sample of wheat lines. In genetics, a haplotype...
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Food-delivery process inside seeds revealed

New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer has identified biochemical pathways necessary for stocking a seed’s food supplies. These findings could be targeted when engineering crops for higher yields. Inside every seed is the embryo of a plant, and in most cases also a storage of food needed to power initial growth of the young seedling. A seed consists mainly of carbohydrates...
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New tools to breed cereal crops that survive flooding

BBSRC-funded scientists at The University of Nottingham hope new research could lead to the introduction of cereal crops better able to tolerate flooding. They have identified the mechanism used by plants in stress conditions to sense low oxygen levels and used advanced breeding techniques to reduce yield loss in barley in water-logged conditions. Previously Michael Holdsworth,...
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Breeding for Bacon, Beer and Biofuels, 16-17 Apr 2015, Edinburgh

The growing world population demands a sustainable intensification of agricultural production across the globe. At the same time there is competition for land use and we have to mitigate both the causes and consequences of climate change. This poses a range of challenges for plant and animal breeders who have to select the genotypes that are best suited to future...
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Genetic toolkit finds new maximum for crop yields

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today announced a new way to dramatically increase crop yields by improving upon Mother Nature’s offerings. A team led by Associate Professor Zachary Lippman, in collaboration with Israeli colleagues, has discovered a set of gene variations that can boost fruit production in the tomato plant by as much as 100%.  Plant breeders...
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Uncovering the pathway to drought tolerant soybeans

Hot, dry conditions can wreak havoc on a field of soybeans. According to the National Center for Soybean Technology, “drought is the greatest threat to profitability.” It is hoped that w ork underway at South Dakota State University may change that. Assistant professor Jai Rohila of the biology and microbiology department is uncovering the molecular mechanisms that lead to drought and...
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Researchers use genomic prediction to model performance of hybrid rice

Genomic prediction, a new field of quantitative genetics, is a statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance. The method works if the trait is heritable, as many traits tend to be, and can be performed early in the life cycle of the plant, helping reduce costs. Now a research team led by plant geneticists...
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New high yield Habanero-type pepper introduced

The Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Texas A&M University recently announced the release of 'CaroTex-312', a new high-yielding, orange-fruited, Habanero type, F1 hybrid pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). According to Kevin M. Crosby from Texas A&M University's Vegetable and Fruit...
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Researchers breed new varieties of chamomile

In contrast to animals, plants can reproduce in a multitude of different ways. Scientists at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna have been working towards developing new varieties of chamomile that can be cultivated as a medicinal plant by identifying varieties that will bloom longer and make its cultivation easier.  Chamomile is a medicinal plant used mainly in the...
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Does genomic selection have a future in plant breeding?

An article recently published in Trends in Biotechnology in asks “Does genomic selection have a future in plant breeding?” Genomic selection, which uses genetic markers across the whole genome, is a relatively recent addition to the animal or plant breeders genomic “tool box.” The technology is already in use for dairy cattle breeding, but its application to plant breeding could be...
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Great mystery of a plant defence pathway unravelled

New research findings could provide fresh leads for breeding crops with an improved defence against diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. Together with several partners, scientists from Wageningen UR (University & Research centre) have discovered that RLP-receptors located at the outside of plant cells and playing an important role in plant defence, join forces with other...
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Selecting for plants with thinner roots could improve drought tolerance

Plants with thinner roots can grow deeper, a trait which could be exploited in lands affected by drought and nutrient deprivation. New research, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting on July 5, shows that maize roots which have fewer cortical cells in the outer layer of their roots are more efficient at accessing water and nutrients. A research team headed by...
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AHDB call for applications for Postgraduate Studentship projects

For full details, please visit the following page of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) website - and the text below was also taken from this website: http://www.ahdb.org.uk/vacancies/PhDStudentships.aspx   Applications are now being sought from universities and research institutes for the AHDB studentship programme for projects starting in...
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Using genetics to biofortify rice

Scientists from the US Agricultural Research Service and their collaborators are focusing on the genes in rice that regulate the uptake and storage of important minerals, in the hope of improving the nutritional value of important crop which acts as a staple food for approximately half the world’s population. Biofortifying rice through plant breeding methods could result in...
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Syngenta’s new wheat breeding facility already producing new lines of wheat

Syngenta’s new state-of-the-art wheat breeding support facility at its Jealott’s Hill Research  and Development site is already producing new lines of wheat, helping to speed up the process of bringing new  crop varieties to the market. The new £2 million glasshouse facility covers 2000 square metres and complements Syngenta’s established wheat breeding...
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UK wheat yields could be boosted by up to 30% with the introduction of a new wheat bred from a wild grass species

The National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) in Cambridge has recreated the original rare cross between an ancient wheat and wild grass species that happened in the Middle East 10,000 years ago. The result is a wheat which, when crossed with modern UK varieties, could offer new sources of yield improvement, drought tolerance, disease resistance and input use efficiency. The...
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How Potatoes had been Cultivated in European Latitudes

With the title: “ Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potatoes cultivation in northern latitudes ” Nature (2013: 495, 246-60) published the identification the central trait underlying the natural variation on potato formation . This work offers to breeders the possibility to select potatoes varieties for different latitudes, harvest times and markets. Potatoes...
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