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Entries with tag crop protection .

New gene-detecting technology brings new, resilient superwheat closer

Scientists at the John Innes Centre (JIC) and The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) have pioneered a new gene-detecting technology which, if deployed correctly could lead to the creation of a new elite variety of wheat with durable resistance to disease. Working with fellow scientists at TSL, Dr Brande Wulff from the JIC developed the new technology called 'MutRenSeq' which accurately pinpoints...
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CHAP: A new Centre for Crop Health and Protection

A new Centre for Crop Health and Protection (CHAP) has just been launched under the government’s Agri-Tech strategy.   CHAP will facilitate collaboration between academia and industry to give farmers access to the best and most sustainable technologies, strategies and protocols to improve crop performance.  The centre will be located at the National...
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Breeding wildness back into our fruit and veg

Wild tomatoes are better able to protect themselves against the destructive whitefly than our modern, commercial varieties, new research has shown. The study, published in the academic journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, shows that in our quest for larger, redder, longer-lasting tomatoes we have inadvertently bred out key characteristics that help the plant defend itself...
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How plant sensors detect pathogens

An international team of scientists has described precisely how a plant can sense a pathogen. “We know that plants have sensors to detect pathogens but we knew little about how they work,” says Professor Banfield from the John Innes Centre. In the mid-20th century, an American scientist named Harold Henry Flor helped explain how certain varieties of plants can fight off some...
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Plant receptors with built-in decoys make pathogens betray themselves

Receptors carrying built-in decoys are the latest discovery in the evolutionary battle between plants and pathogens. The decoy domains within the receptor detect pathogens and raise the cell's alarm when there is an infection. Plants display component parts of their immune system on receptors to trick pathogens into binding with them, which then triggers defence mechanisms. The discovery...
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TGAC and JIC identify new genetic markers to combat yellow rust disease in wheat

A new study has identified genetic markers that signal resistance to the wheat yellow rust pathogen. As the global population soars, there is a heightening pressure on agriculture to produce enough food to satisfy worldwide demand. Wheat is a major crop providing over 20% of the world's calorie and 25% of its protein intake. This vital crop's productivity is threatened by devastating...
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Discovery provides new targets for breeding powdery mildew resistant barley

New research at the University of Adelaide has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew. In Australia, annual barley production is second only to wheat with 7-8 million tonnes a year. Powdery mildew is one of the most important diseases of barley. Senior Research Scientist Dr Alan Little and team have discovered the composition of...
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Weeds grow like weeds when they grow with corn

The axiom, “growing like a weed,” takes on new meaning in light of changes in gene expression that occur when weeds interact with the crops they infest, according to plant scientist Sharon Clay. Using sophisticated genetic-mapping techniques, the South Dakota State University professor and her research team are documenting how corn and weeds influence one another. “Weeds grow like weeds...
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Frog eggs help researchers find new information on grapevine disease

Vitis vinifera  are common grapevines and are the world’s favorite wine-producing varietal. However, research has shown that grapevines are susceptible to powdery mildew, a plant disease, which contributes to significant crop loss for most commercial wine varietals that are cultivated each year. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have used frog eggs to determine the cause...
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New way to protect crops from pests and disease

A team of international researchers has uncovered a mechanism by which plants are able to better defend themselves against disease-causing pathogens. The work, led by Dr Jurriaan Ton and Dr Estrella Luna at the University of Sheffield, has identified the key receptor binding a chemical called BABA (β-aminobutyric acid) which is boosting plant immunity. BABA has long been known for...
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Decoding the chemical vocabulary of plants

Plants spend their entire lifetime rooted to one spot. When faced with a bad situation, such as a swarm of hungry herbivores or a viral outbreak, they cannot flee so instead must fight to survive. What is the key to their defense? Chemistry. Thanks to this ongoing conflict, plants have evolved into amazing chemists, capable of synthesizing tens of thousands of compounds from thousands of...
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Genetic discovery could help keep crops disease-free

Curtin University researchers have found a way to breed disease-resistant wheat with no downside, potentially bringing multi-million dollar savings to Australia’s agricultural industry. According to John Curtin Distinguished Professor Richard Oliver, Director of the Australian Centre for Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens (ACNFP) at Curtin, farmers can lose more than 0.35 tonnes per hectare...
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Secrets of potato blight evolution could help farmers fight back

Scientists have discovered vital clues as to how the pathogen responsible for the Irish potato famine adapted to spread between different plant species. BBSRC funded researchers at Oxford University and The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, looked in unprecedented detail at how  Phytophthora infestans , a pathogen that continues to blight potatoes and tomatoes today, evolved to target...
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Locust genome sequence could aid development of new insecticides

A team of scientists, including researchers from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and BGI have published the whole genome sequence of the most common locust species, Locusta migratoria. They have found that the locust genome is huge - 6.5 gigabytes – making it the largest animal genome sequenced to date. The researchers were particularly interested in identifying...
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Scientists reveal gene mechanism to combat Turnip mosaic virus

The traditional Christmas dinner accompaniment of Brussels sprouts could be protected from a damaging crop virus thanks to work from BBSRC-funded researchers. Scientists have described a mechanism conferring resistance in brassica plants to Turnip mosaic virus, a discovery which it is hoped will lead to durable resistance being introduced into food crops, including sprouts. The...
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Recommendations for delaying resistance to Bt Corn in western corn rootworm

Bt corn, containing proteins that protect it from insect damage, has been grown in the U.S. since the mid-1990s. It is known as Bt corn because the proteins are derived from a bacterium called  Bacillus thuringiensis . While Bt corn has been highly effective against the European corn borer, it has been less so against the western corn rootworm, which has been documented to show...
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The emergence of new crop pests: genetics in action

BBSRC-funded scientists at Rothamsted Research discover the genetic mechanisms that allow aphids to adapt to a new host plant and provide natural resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides. Insect host shifts are important because they may be a first step in the evolution of new species and can create new pests of agriculturally important crops. A barrier to many potential insect host...
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Developing soybean varieties with resistance to Asian Soybean Rust

Evogene Ltd., a plant genomics company specialising in enhancing crop productivity for the food, feed and biofuel industries, is to extend and expand its multi-year research collaboration with DuPont Pioneer, the seed business of DuPont, for developing soybean varieties displaying resistance to Asian Soybean Rust (ASR). Soybean is one of the most important commercial crops around the...
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Barley crops affected by disease found on common wild grass

A major fungal pathogen which affects barley crops is also present on a common wild grass according to a new study by leading agricultural researchers including the University of Hertfordshire. Barley is the second most important cereal crop grown in the UK - used as animal fodder, in human foods such as health foods, soups and stews, and also in the drinks production industry. ...
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Great mystery of a plant defence pathway unravelled

New research findings could provide fresh leads for breeding crops with an improved defence against diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. Together with several partners, scientists from Wageningen UR (University & Research centre) have discovered that RLP-receptors located at the outside of plant cells and playing an important role in plant defence, join forces with other...
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Discovery of a gene that controls black-grass resistance offers prospect of better weed control

BBSRC-funded scientists at the Universities of York and Durham have discovered a gene called AmGSTF1 that plays a key role in controlling multi-herbicide resistance (MHR) in black-grass and rye-grass. Chemicals that inhibit this gene can be used to make weed killers effective against resistant weeds. Black-grass and rye-grass are both widespread and serious weed problems in...
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Resistance gene found against Ug99 wheat stem rust pathogen

A research project led by scientists at Kansas State University and the University of California-Davis has identified a gene that gives wheat plants resistance to one of the most deadly races of the wheat stem rust pathogen -- called Ug99 -- that was first discovered in Uganda in 1999. The discovery may help scientists develop new wheat varieties and strategies that protect the world's...
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AHDB call for applications for Postgraduate Studentship projects

For full details, please visit the following page of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) website - and the text below was also taken from this website: http://www.ahdb.org.uk/vacancies/PhDStudentships.aspx   Applications are now being sought from universities and research institutes for the AHDB studentship programme for projects starting in...
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The identification of 5 new Plant Activator Compounds will help to protect crops without decreasing yield.

Like animals, plants activate their innate immune system upon recognition of pathogens. Plant activators, compounds that activate a plant's immune system in response to invasion by pathogens, play a crucial role in crop survival by triggering a range of immune responses. Their advantage compared to pesticides is that Plant Activators aren’t pathogen specific. Yet, they have a key...
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