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Entries with Sector Types Bioscience .

Catch up on the latest plant sector news, funding and events

We have just published the March edition of our Plant Sector newsletter.    Click here to view the newsletter and find out about the latest  news, funding and events of relevance to the plant and crops sector . Would you like to receive our monthly plant sector newsletter by email? You can send your request to be added to the plant sector mailing list to ...
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Breeding dogs on the basis of single genetic test carries risks and may not improve the health of pedigree lines

Breeding dogs on the basis of a single genetic test carries risks and may not improve the health of pedigree lines, experts warn.  Only a combined approach that makes use of DNA analysis, health screening schemes and pedigree information will significantly reduce the frequency of inherited diseases.  This approach will also improve genetic diversity, which helps to counteract the...
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Scientists transfer pathogen-sensing ‘antenna’ gene to wheat

A team of BBSRC-funded scientists have successfully transferred a receptor into wheat that recognises bacteria and triggers a defensive response. The gene from the model plant  Arabidopsis thaliana  could help increase resistance to bacterial disease in wheat crops. The scientists from the John Innes Centre (JIC), the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) and The...
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Novel online bioinformatics tool significantly reduces time of multiple genome analysis

A BBSRC-funded research collaboration has developed a new open access tool called PolyMaker that will support the selection of beneficial traits for future crop breeding programmes. The new software enables automated primer design for multiple genome species, significantly reducing the time of multiple genome analysis. With a rising global population leading to increased pressure on food...
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New research shows that animals tend to evolve toward larger size over time

Does evolution follow certain rules? If, in the words of the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould, one could "rewind the tape of life", would certain biological trends reemerge? Asked another way: can evolution be predicted? New research suggests that, for at least one important biological trait-body size-the answer is yes. In one of the most comprehensive studies of body...
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Reducing GM crop contamination risks by turning cross-pollinators into self-pollinators

Genetically modified crops have long drawn fire from opponents worried about potential contamination of conventional crops and other plants. Now a plant gene discovered by University of Guelph scientists might help farmers reduce the risk of GM contamination and quell arguments against the use of transgenic food crops, says Sherif Sherif, lead author of a new research paper describing the...
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BBSRC and USDA-NIFA partner for animal disease prevention research

BBSRC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) have announced five jointly-funded research awards that total more £2.3M from BBSRC and $2.3M from NIFA for the US-UK Collaborative Animal Health and Disease and Veterinary Immune Reagents program. This US-UK partnership addresses high impact diseases and animal health issues relevant...
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Catch up on the latest animal sector news, funding and events

We have today published our latest Animal Sector newsletter. If you didn't get a copy you can click here to view it in your browser. To make sure that you don't miss out in future, why not email us with a  request to add you to our distribution list.      
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Enhancing high-temperature tolerance in plants

A research group at the Kobe University Graduate School of Agricultural Science Functional Phytochemistry Laboratory has identified for the first time that the (E)-2-hexenal, a plant-derived chemical substance, can induce a plant’s stress response to high temperatures.  Key findings include: Plants essentially have a high-temperature resistance function. It is switched...
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KTN scoping study leads to major investment in beef efficiency selective breeding project

The KTN is pleased to report that scoping work led by our agri-food team has led to the establishment of a £1.75m selective breeding project to improve both the sustainability and competitiveness of the UK beef industry. Back in 2012 the KTN led a Defra commissioned scoping study to identify options for large scale and – importantly - industry supported recording of feed...
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New tools to breed cereal crops that survive flooding

BBSRC-funded scientists at The University of Nottingham hope new research could lead to the introduction of cereal crops better able to tolerate flooding. They have identified the mechanism used by plants in stress conditions to sense low oxygen levels and used advanced breeding techniques to reduce yield loss in barley in water-logged conditions. Previously Michael Holdsworth,...
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Genome sequences of 69 pigs provides clues to their thermostatic regulation

Scientists from Jiangxi Agricultural University, BGI and University of California have recently published their latest research on the genetic mechanism of pig altitude-adaptations in Nature Genetics online. Their research underlined the importance of introgression for the first time as a potential reason for pig adaptations to cold and hot environments, which provided novel...
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New inherited disease identified in Ayrshire cattle

A research group led by Professor Magnus Andersson at the University of Helsinki has discovered a new inherited disease that causes ptosis, retarded growth, intellectual disability and mortality in Ayrshire calves.  The study was published in BMC genomics journal on 12 October 2014. The disease has proved to be associated with a mutation in UBE3B gene. Of the 129 tested...
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New hope for fighting major fungal disease in durum wheat

A variety of wheat that is resistant to a destructive fungal disease has been found to have specialised and protective cell walls, according to research published in BMC Plant Biology. These insights could help to produce stronger, disease-resistant varieties of durum wheat for improved pasta production. Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) is a fungal disease that affects worldwide wheat...
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BBSRC/EMBRAPA joint call for collaborative research proposals in wheat research

BBSRC and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation ( Embrapa) have announced a joint call for collaborative research proposals in wheat research. The purpose of this pump-priming award is: to enable UK and Brazilian researchers to work together to develop competitive, integrated, collaborative research proposals for submission to the BBSRC/EMBRAPA Joint Wheat full...
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KTN Associate, Laura Corbin, awarded Genetic's Society prize

The KTN would like to congratulate Laura Corbin on being awarded the Genetics Society’s Sir Kenneth Mather Prize for 2012/13, following her nomination by her PhD supervisor, Professor John Woolliams of The Roslin Institute.  Professor Williams said, “The award is very prestigious and recognises the excellence of [Laura’s] PhD thesis and the achievements associated with it, and is...
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Chickens and turkeys 'closer to dinosaur ancestors' than other birds

New research from the University of Kent suggests that chickens and turkeys have experienced fewer gross genomic changes than other birds as they evolved from their dinosaur ancestor. Professor Darren Griffin and a team at the University's School of Biosciences have conducted research that suggests that chromosomes of the chicken and turkey lineage have undergone the fewest number of...
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Model of oil palm cultivate may help maximise yield and minimise detrimental environmental impacts

Australian scientists have developed a model for oil palm cultivation, aimed at helping growers of the crop maximize the yields of their plantations, while minimizing detrimental environmental impacts. The model was recently published in the journal Environmental Modeling & Software. "Oil palm has become a major crop in the tropics, cultivated on more than 39 million acres...
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Researchers find salt tolerance gene in soybean

A collaborative research project between Australian and Chinese scientists has shown how soybean can be bred to better tolerate soil salinity. The researchers, at the University of Adelaide in Australia and the Institute of Crop Sciences in the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, have identified a specific gene in soybean that has great potential for soybean crop...
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Exploring and Exploiting the Microbiome, 23rd February at Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh

The rise of metagenomics has allowed us to explore the human microbiome and that of domestic livestock, plants and the environment, offering interesting opportunities to exploit this knowledge for the health and wellbeing of all. The aim of this  Exploring and Exploiting the Microbiome event, on 23rd February at Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh, is to raise awareness about...
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Invitation to Pig Breeders Round Table 2015

PIG BREEDERS ROUND TABLE 22nd-23rd April 2015 - University of Kent (Keynes College), Canterbury Pig Breeders Round Table is a small, friendly bi-annual meeting with interesting science and stimulating discussion held in a beautiful location. The University of Kent is set in 450 acres of parkland overlooking the historic city of Canterbury and its famous...
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Scientists uncover 4-stranded elements of maize DNA

A team led by Florida State University researchers has identified DNA elements in maize that could affect the expression of hundreds or thousands of genes. “Maybe they are part of the machinery that allows an organism to turn hundreds of genes off or on,” said Associate Professor of Biological Science Hank Bass. Bass and Carson Andorf, a doctoral student in computer science at Iowa...
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TGAC and JIC identify new genetic markers to combat yellow rust disease in wheat

A new study has identified genetic markers that signal resistance to the wheat yellow rust pathogen. As the global population soars, there is a heightening pressure on agriculture to produce enough food to satisfy worldwide demand. Wheat is a major crop providing over 20% of the world's calorie and 25% of its protein intake. This vital crop's productivity is threatened by devastating...
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Black-grass Resistance Initiative gets battle underway

Work is now well underway as part of a £2.8M BBSRC-HGCA-funded project to tackle the threat to cereal crops posed by the weed black-grass. A consortium of researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Newcastle, Sheffield and York with colleagues from Rothamsted Research and the Zoological Society of London started working on the four-year BBSRC-HGCA Black-grass Resistance Initiative...
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Gene critical to the development of low arsenic plants identified

A discovery could pave the way for a new generation of crops which do not absorb high levels of the poison arsenic. Concerns about arsenic in food have grown in recent years with high concentrations found in rice, fruit juices and even baby food. A naturally occurring element found in soil and water, arsenic has also been used as a pesticide, and is taken up by plants and can then enter...
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