KTN's online platform helps you to make the connections you need

 

The Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) has refreshed its online platform to intelligently connect you to relevant events, funding, thought pieces and specialist staff to help your business innovate and grow.

You can discover content using your area of interest, from Defence Security to transport; from space to health – all major UK economic sectors are covered. Once you have selected your interests, using our intelligent tagging system, we will then display rich and relevant content related to your area, often from surprising sources.

An example might be new satellite technology from the space sector that is applicable in the agri-food sector. KTN-UK.co.uk will help you form these unusual and valuable connections.

All content on the platform has been carefully curated by our team of innovation specialists – not by an automated algorithm – so you can be confident that KTN is connecting you to the most relevant cutting-edge information.

 

The move also marks a closer alignment with our main funder, Innovate UK , with the website branding making a clear visual link. Knowledge Transfer Network is Innovate UK's innovation network partner, and also works with other funders to provide innovation networking services and fulfil our mission to drive UK growth.

We link new ideas and opportunities with expertise, markets and finance through our network of businesses, universities, funders and investors. From agri-food to autonomous systems and from energy to design, KTN combines expertise in all sectors with the ability to cross boundaries. Connecting with KTN can lead to potential partners, horizon-expanding events and innovation insights relevant to your needs.

Visit our people pages to connect directly with expertise in your sector.

Visit the KTN refreshed online platfom here

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Dawn of gene-editing medicine?

Exceprt from article by BBC health editor James Gallagher 

Does the smiling face of Layla Richards mark a new era in genetic medicine that could change all our lives?

Her story is simply remarkable and a world first.

On the day before her first birthday, Layla's parents were told that all treatments for her leukaemia had failed and she was going to die.

The determination of her family, doctors and a biotechnology company led to her being given an experimental therapy that had previously been tried only in mice.

Now, just months after her family was told her cancer was incurable, Layla is not only alive, but a happy, giggling child with no trace of leukaemia in her body.

The "miracle" treatment was a tiny vial filled with genetically engineered immune cells that were designed to kill her cancer.

There's no doubt this is exciting stuff and it raises questions about the future of medicine.

There is already talk of a revolution - of using similar techniques to treat a range of cancers, but also inherited diseases such as sickle cell anaemia.

But we have been here before.

Around the turn of the millennium, over-excited scientists and journalists were proclaiming that gene therapy was going to transform the world.

It hasn't happened, so has the "miracle" really changed anything?

Prof Adrian Thrasher, from Great Ormond Street Hospital, told me: "There was a lot of hype that was unrealistic at the time, the technologies were very new and it's taken 15-20 years for those technologies to mature.

"I think we're seeing the fruits of those early studies right now, so I think this is real."

Exceprt from article by BBC health editor James Gallagher read the full original article here