Articles

« go back

Keep track of your wellbeing with an online health record

Digital Life Sciences is inviting people to keep track of their health and make their own personal care plans online.

Anyone can register with A Better Plan and use it to monitor their fitness, keep a log of their happiness, set goals and create action plans.

The secure online service allows people to:

  • reflect on their health and current situation
  • record their own health measurements directly from a variety of devices
  • monitor their medicines compliance and see the benefits as trends
  • see their health and wellbeing over a period of time
  • create and review action plans, as well as allocate actions to others
  • share all of  this information safely with friends, family, other health professionals or statutory services, whilst remaining in control.

Davie McGirr, Head of Product Design, said: “There is a a great need for good collaborative and convivial tools that work simply and that enable citizens and carers take a share of the responsibility for their care.”

It has been shown that creating a personal care plan helps patients:

  • feel supported and know how to look after themselves
  • attend clinic when they have an appointment, reducing the rate of DNAs
  • reduce attendance at A&E.

When patients create personal care plans and share them online it helps:

  • GPs, nursing and social care teams to manage their case loads more easily and at a reduced cost
  • reduce hospital readmissions as patients are discharged with clear plans that they own and understand
  • manage patients through care pathways that involve multi-disciplinary teams, reducing duplication, error and administration.

Online personalised care planning is also useful in situations where people are not able to make plans for themselves, such as when they have severe dementia.  The plans can then be made by family members and shared with staff in care homes who can also contribute to the plan.

A Better Plan has been developed by Digital Life Sciences through Year Zero, one of the four projects in the dallas programme supported by the Technology Strategy Board and Department of Health.

Comments
No comments yet. Be the first.

Recent Blogs

Why doctors dread digital data

A recent article in the New Statesman explores the intersection of big data and increased life...

People are being encouraged to self-manage their healthcare...Academics explore if the UK is ready for this approach?

A pioneering £37 million research project involving the University of Strathclyde could give...