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3D Printing to Teach Math and Science

We completely understand: 3D printing can sound intimidating. But it can open so many doors for students, especially in math and science.
 
Fear not, brave teacher. We’ve got just what you need to move your 3D-printing goals forward—whether your 3D printer has a cozy little spot in your supply closet, silently collecting dust, or you and your students have jumped feet-first into 3D-printing projects.
 
Get moving and shaking with these project ideas:
 
1. Design custom artwork frames.
This project is perfect for elementary students. They’ll practice their geometry skills as well as calculate measurements, weights and balance as they design a modular frame for a specific piece of art. As an extension, challenge students to create decorations that can snap on and off of the frame for a fully customized display.
 
TOPIC: Math,Science,Technology
Lesson Plans
9 Amazing Ways Teachers Can Use 3D Printing to Teach Math and Science
These ideas will make you want a 3D printer if you don’t already have one.
 Karen Kane on February 24, 2017
3D Printer — 9 Ways to Teach Math and Science
We completely understand: 3D printing can sound intimidating. But it can open so many doors for students, especially in math and science.
 
Fear not, brave teacher. We’ve got just what you need to move your 3D-printing goals forward—whether your 3D printer has a cozy little spot in your supply closet, silently collecting dust, or you and your students have jumped feet-first into 3D-printing projects.
 
Get moving and shaking with these project ideas:
 
1. Design custom artwork frames.
This project is perfect for elementary students. They’ll practice their geometry skills as well as calculate measurements, weights and balance as they design a modular frame for a specific piece of art. As an extension, challenge students to create decorations that can snap on and off of the frame for a fully customized display.
 
KNow more about the HP Printer Repair.
 
2. Go cross-curricular.
Here’s a fun idea! Brock Perkins, a fifth grade teacher at Winchester Thurston School in Pennsylvania, teaches an extensive cross-curricular unit on the Middle Ages. Students learn about the lives of the peasants and the nobility, castle structure and design, and they study siege machines like catapults and battering rams.
 
He and the school’s instructional technology specialist, Katie Weber, introduced the 3D-printing element of the project by printing out several different designs of catapults (found on www.thingiverse.com) and predicting and then testing the ability of these machines to launch projectiles. They then pair students up to brainstorm a design of their own to print on their 3D printer.
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